Street place to hawk in the busy

Street hawking/vending is something that has been carried on since years and decades. It is very common in the cities as people from local districts, villages and nearby areas, migrate here due to the lack of proper jobs to earn a living and two square meals for themselves and their families. As hard as life gets for them, their day starts with struggling to find a place to hawk in the busy streets, then managing to earn a little profit over their business and then to feed themselves. Usually they find a place and sit around in the busy streets or localities with a strategy to attract more customers for their business.Street hawkers in Jaipur face similar challenge as others hawkers in other cities. Jaipur’s old city serves as a home for their business. Most of the street vending and hawking that is done here takes place in the old city like Johari Bazar, Tripolia Bazar, Chaura Rasta etc as these areas are crowded for almost 9-10 hours a day. Street vendors are mostly engaged in selling vegetables, accessories, garments, décor products, street food etc. Hawkers take up places on the pavements, streets, footpaths and some are even spotted in the non-vending areas until the cops show up. Although many of them have the license to run their business, those who not have one have a hard time convincing the cops to not take any action against them and in the process, they end up paying some amount of money either weekly or monthly which is known as ‘hafta’ to be able to survive and earn food for themselves. Such people have no other place to go to and if taking a small area on a pavement is fetching them a meal for a day then why not? Many people pose these vendors as a threat to the general public because they take up spaces on the streets and can be the cause of accidents, traffic jams etc. They might cause jams or even create hustle-bustle in the otherwise crowded localities but there is surely more than what meets the eye. If over-crowdedness is a concern, then they may be relocated to some other area where they can carry their business well. Just like everything have pros and cons, similarly hawkers might create a little disturbance out there on the streets but they are also causing good to the country and the city. They do their little by contributing to the economy of the country. They sell things at a low rate that is affordable by many people. It is because of them that the Bazaar looks like one creating the entire hodgepodge and giving a crowded scenario from morning till evening to the onlookers and tourists from different cities and countries. In my eyes, these vendors are hard-working, who, despite of facing so many troubles decide to take up this struggling business from which they only fetch Rs.200-300 as profit on a daily basis. Instead of regarding them as a menace, they should be respected and should be granted their basic right to livelihood in every way possible.Having interpreted the above, I conclude that a designer shall analyze both sides of the coin. It is indeed important for a designer to be neutral while conducting any research because he/she simply can’t design anything based on their assumptions. All people are different in many ways and a designer should be neutral, i.e. he should see the positives and the negatives, the good and the bad, the likes and dislikes without any judgment to be able to come up with the most appropriate design for the people which is thoughtful and not just intuitive.