p.p1 Jumuáh’s (2009) The Effect of Parental Involvement on

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According to previous studies such as Wilder’s (2014) Effects of Parental Involvement on Academic Achievement: A Meta-Synthesis, Arguea & Conroy’s (2003) The Effect of Parental Involvement in Parent-Teacher Groups on Student Achievement, Smith’s (2011) The Impact of Parental Involvement on Student Achievement, Hayes’ (2012) Parental Involvement and Achievement Outcomes in African-American Adolescents, Jumuáh’s (2009) The Effect of Parental Involvement on Student Achievement at Hillside High School Twilight Academy, Jeynes’ (2003) The Effects of Parental Involvement on Minority Children’s Academic Achievement, White-Stephens’ (2010) The Impact of Parental Involvement on the Literacy Success of Students, Topor et. al. (2010) Parental Involvement and Student Academic Performance: A Multiple Mediational Analysis, Desforges & Abouchaar’s (2003) The Impact of Parental Involvement, Parental Support, and Family Education on Pupil Achievement and Adjustment: A Literature Review, and Thurston’s (2005) Leveling at Home Advantage: Assessing the Effectiveness of Parental Involvement in Elementary School, that 9 out of these 10 studies revealed that parental involvement has an impact on student’s academic achievement. It prompted to inform that parental involvement on students is the head start or the foundation for the student’s education. Most likely, studies show based from the findings of previous researches, family involvement or engagement is a strong determinant of student success. Students with involved parents or guardians earn higher grades at test scores, have better social skills and show improved behavior. It also reveals that family or parental involvement improved student’s academic achievement, reduces absenteeism and restores parents confidence in their child’s education.
The general objective of the study is to show the impacts of parental involvement on academic achievements of Grade 7 students in St. Paul College of Bocaue. It aims to know the different approaches of parents to their children and its effects on their academic achievement. Also to identify the type of parental involvement participation currently in schools that have an impact on student achievement and areas in which they could improve with regards to concerns about their children.

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Significance of the Study

Parent involvement in this study involves the following sub-variables: a) Parenting, b) Learning at Home, c) Involvement on their child’s school volunteering, d) Community Involvement, and e) Familiarity with school information. It means that parents at home and school settings are meant to support their children’s educational progress. Measures of parent involvement commonly include the quality and frequency of communication with teachers as well as participation in school functions and activities (Dearing et. al, Dearing & Kreider, et. al, 2006, Machen, Wilson & Notar, 2004). The study aims to know if there is an impact of parental involvement on academic achievements of students. By knowing the impacts, the researchers can present the possible contributions to the following:

Students – This study would benefit the students by letting them know the impacts of their parent’s involvement on their academic achievements. It is also for them to be aware of the importance of it to their performances. 

Parents – This study aims to let parents be aware of the possible impacts of their involvement with the child’s academics and how it reflects on their achievements. Also, to present possible approaches that they could use for their child’s development and better performance in school.

School Administration – The findings of this study will promote knowledge on how parents should properly hone their children to achieve academic excellence.

Researchers – The study could serve as a guide for the future researches that they will be conducting. Moreover, to serve as an additional source for them to gather more accurate and significant information. 

Theoretical Framework

This study is guided by the following theories. First one is Jean Piaget’s Cognitive Development Theory in 1981 wherein he emphasized the constructive role of experience with peers and family members. The basic assumption of his theory was that young children are active learners with a constant drive to match their internal constructions (their own view of the real world) and external constructions (the external realities they face with in their surroundings) (Piaget, 1981). Supporting Piaget’s theory, Athey stated that in this regard, children learn well when they have opportunities to interact with their environments, and particularly with their parents who are a vital part of children’s environments (2007). For example, parent involvement include activities such as practicing interactive homework which is said to be effective in creating opportunities for children to interact meaningfully with their parents such that children construct their own knowledge within both a social and physical environment through this process (Bailey, Silvern, Brabham, & Ross, 2004). As a consequence, Piaget’s social development theory supports the idea that parent involvement is a crucial factor in children’s development and achievement.
Another theory is the Parental Development Theory by Ratelle et al. in 2005, wherein the parents must view themselves as supportive and involved in order to be just that for their child. It is important to note that this theory brings light to how a parent becomes involved and supportive to a child. It is important to note, however, that these two factors are distinct and they likely contribute to esteem and efficiency in unique ways. Parental involvement is characterized by the presence of a parent in one’s daily life and school activities. Parents who are involved in the student’s life participate and make an effort to attend their child’s events, school activities, and be involved in the student’s academic pursuits. In addition, parental support incorporates the emotional role parents play in their child’s lives.
Lastly, it will be based on James Coleman’s Social Capital Theory. In the 1980s James Coleman developed the concept of social capital to conceptualize social patterns and processes that contribute to the ethnic disparities of student achievement. He argued that the educational expectation, norms, and obligations that exist within a family or a community are important social capital that can influence the level of parental involvement and investment, which in turn affect academic success. In the context of education, social capital in the forms of parental expectations, obligations, and social networks that exist within the family, school, and community are important for student success. These variations in academic success can be attributed to parents’ expectations and obligations for educating their children; to the network and connections between families whom the school serves; to the disciplinary and academic climate at school; and to the cultural norms and values that promote student efforts. The concept of social capital is a useful theoretical construct for explaining the disparities in students’ educational performance among different nations.
Studies on parent involvement use several measures, including the type and amount of parent-school communication. This involves tracking the number of calls made to the student’s home, participation in returning notes or surveys, and recording the number of parents receiving and reading district or school newsletters. Studies also monitor the time parents spend at the school as volunteers, attendance at open houses and the number of times parents visit school during the year. Involvement measures also survey how parents support the school in the home such as offering assistance with homework and projects, and encouragement for sports and activities. Measures also evaluate the voluntary actions of parents to enhance school lessons with special trips to museums or travel that incorporates education (Ryan, 2015). Guided by these measurements, the researchers will be having a set of questionnaires that will be based on the theories related to our study and also by the sub-variables found such as a) Parenting, b) Learning at Home, c) Involvement on their child’s school volunteering, d) Community Involvement, and e) Familiarity with school information in relation with Ratelle’s (2015) Parental Development Theory, he emphasized the effect of the presences of parents in school activities or events and how it affects the students’ academic pursuits.