Jon of this book, it can be considered

Jon Ronson, a British journalist, author of So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed. He is also a screenwriter, and radio presenter whose works involve The Men Who Stare at Goats and The Psychopath Test. Ronson is notorious for his investigations of politics and science. He has published nine books and his work has appeared in The Guardian, City Life and Time Out.

Ronson tries to understand the society that rejects people that made a slight mistake in their eyes. He investigates the wonder of online shaming. He has travelled for the past three years meeting public humiliation receivers. People who have made a bad joke on social media, or even made a mistake at work. Once their offense was exposed, they were being torn apart by an angry mob, and sometimes even fired. This book is certainly making people think before posting something online.

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This book is intended to a general audience, the language and terminology make of this a relatable text for the public. It talks about the latest generation, and how its involvement with social media has radically increased. Given the subject of this book, it can be considered as open to any reader. The lexicon is adequate to express his point of view clearly. Besides, at some point he recalls some explicit texts that were directed to the interviewed. Those texts emphasize the magnitude of each story, giving the public a more detailed approach. The book can be directed to those who were conscious and somewhat involved in those disputes. It can be addressed as well to the present generation so that they can get some awareness in the matter.

 

In his text, Ronson aims to portray that a generation of public shaming is widespread. The majority was defining the limits of normality by ruining the lives of the offenders. Shame was used as a form of social control. The book is honest about modern life, packed with details about the escalating war on human flaws. A crude joke or comment can induce a public shaming capable of wrecking anyone’s life. His deep research into the world of online shaming raises fear. Ronson argues that the Internet has revived the practice of public humiliation and given it greater reach in recent years.