It’s the person trying out for the

It’s 2017 guys, there are 63 different genders. Are we going to make a team for every gender in every sport? We should just make all sports co-ed so they can play sports with everyone else.

There have been studies done that show girls are normally more agile and flexible, but boys usually have more strength, are bigger, and have better endurance. Putting the genders together would make a team that is strong in all areas.

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A respondent on Debate.org said, “Everyone has an equal opportunity if a woman wants to try out for the NFL (say as a lineman for example), is she believes she can handle that job, why should she not be able to try out for the team? Many men try out for ‘men’s sports’ and get cut because they are not good enough, fast enough, strong enough, etc., etc., etc. But to deny a person’s participation based on anything but ‘can you catch the ball’, ‘make the pass’, ‘run the distance’, ‘stop the defensive line’, should always be left up to the person trying out for the sport. To base ‘qualification’ on gender is just as bad as basing qualification on race. There was a time that it was thought blacks couldn’t play sports and that turned out to be a crock, what’s the worst that could happen, we discover that women are better quarterbacks in the NFL?”

Women are usually better team players but men tend to focus more on their individual success. To have a successful team you need a mix of those two, instead of on fully one or the other. Playing together will make the team more successful. Physical differences are a large part in how successful a person can or will be. 

“A 135-pound girl who wants to play high school football could easily be up against a 250-pound opponent…and that size difference matters. But in soccer, a 135-pound girl might not be at as much of a disadvantage.” (Sportssignup.com)

The only reason I have found for not having co-ed teams is the one above. A 135-pound girl should not go up against a 250-pound boy. But a 135-pound person should go up again a 250-pound person in general, that is setting up the smaller person for injuries.

 “In 2013 a 12-year-old Ohio girl named Makhaela Jenkins fought her school’s district court over her right to play on a boys-only football team. She ultimately won and was allowed to play. According to the National Federation of State High School Associations, there were more than 1,500 girls playing on boy’s football teams that year, and the trend was growing with a 17% uptick since 2009.” (Sportssignup.com)

Co-ed sports urges athletes to compete and train together for the advantage of the team. Teammates see the advantages of cooperation for success and learn to pick their team members based on who has the best chance at succeeding. They learn from watching and observing the differences in how their teammates process information. Coaches succeed when they encourage the equality and appreciation of player based on their skill not gender.

Co-ed games draw out the best in players from all genders: There are fewer complaints, almost no trash talk and very few fights in comparison with same-sex games, it also encourages men to develop more patience while women benefit by improving their skills and strength to keep up as men are usually faster and stronger players than women. There are generally fewer injuries in Co-ed games compared to same sex games, stronger players either make a conscious effort to slow down, or do so subconsciously when faced with players of the opposite sex. Players are always excited about the opportunity to meet and socialize with players of the opposite sex and it gives them another reason to go out and play. Some players also try harder and play better to avoid being ridiculed in front of the opposite sex and it helps them get better.

“Coed teams encourage mutual respect between genders. Praising and rewarding players based on skill demonstrates that knowledge and understanding of a sport, physical expertise and ability don’t fall along gender lines. Encouraging coed teams at beginning levels and ages teaches kids to evaluate others on skill and may help change beliefs regarding gender inequality in sports.” (healthyliving.azcentral.com)

Co-ed teams are more cost effective because it allows to have less teams which means they don’t need to have as many paid coaches. Having co-ed teams would also make scheduling games, reserving fields, and finding other schools to play that have enough girl players much easier.