It the opposite; there has been an

It can be observed in the natural
world, that as systems grow, their complexity and diversity increases and
consequently they have greater resistance to perturbations – they are more
stable. However, the global economic system is behaving just the opposite;
there has been an extended tendency for diverse arrays of local or regional
businesses to increase their size through mergers, acquisitions and competitive
exclusion. In the US, companies such as Walmart have cornered the market with
their impossible to compete with low prices as they cut corners and outsource
to cheap labour in less environmentally regulated countries such as China and
the middle east and cut employee benefits. It is hard to believe that
decreasing prices of consumer products are seen as an indicator of progress
when the corners cut to reach these low prices are anything but progression.
These are costs that, as a society, we all pay, and they have big impacts on
the quality of life for first and third world country citizens alike. Although
these low prices are compelling, the culture of Primark and euro stores is
extremely damaging and as consumers we must become better at shopping smart
and, as mentioned before, begin to take notice of where our goods are being
produced and consider paying a slightly higher price to support sustainable
development in our own countries without supporting environmentally detrimental
outsourcing of production to countries where workers are payed scandalously low
wages and work in hazardous environments. This homogeneity in the global
markets have also lead to a dangerously high rise of corporate power in recent
years with high levels of lobbying and influence in governmental decisions. All
of these factors point to supporting local, even if it means taking a price
hit, as the current model of increasing homogeneity is unsustainable and
contradicts the way natural complex systems function.