In of the supernatural into perspective. The Weird

        In Macbeth, supernatural occurrences and nature are significant motifs because they contribute to the experiences and consequences of the characters and appear multiple times throughout the story. The daggers and the weird sisters are two key examples of supernatural elements. Nature is apparent in almost every scene throughout the story. Fire, wind, flowers, and animals are examples of natural occurrences.     The supernatural elements are illustrated to the audience in many different forms. Shakespeare uses the Weird sisters to exhibit a haunting atmosphere and bring the matter of the supernatural into perspective. The Weird sisters proclaim prophecies to Banquo and Macbeth about their future lives. They proclaim that Macbeth will become king and they warn Macbeth to beware Macduff, along with other predictions. In act 1 scene 3, Macbeth refers to the witches as “instruments of darkness”. The Weird sister creates a haunting aura because they cause storms, create potions, and chant magic spells.  Another supernatural element is the floating dagger that appears to Macbeth when he becomes delusional. The dagger is what pushes Macbeth to commit the murder of King Duncan and this is what shows the audience the dagger is evil. In Act 2 Scene 1, Macbeth says,  “Is this dagger I see in front of me, with its handle pointing toward my hand? Come let me hold you.” which shows Macbeth making a poor decision and causing him to fulfill the prophecy. In Macbeth these supernatural elements, along with many others, are an integral part of the plot and the structure of the play.     Nature plays a considerable role throughout the whole play. Multiple times all throughout Macbeth, the weather was a major symbol for darkness and evil happenings. The night that Duncan is killed by Macbeth, the witches conjure up a terrible storm that violated the natural order. In the very beginning of the play, the witches are concocting a potion and proclaiming the prophecies. During this scene a raging storm starts to surface and forceful winds occur. The use of nature is prominent when characters are comparing others to items in nature. For example, Lady Macbeth tells Macbeth that he has to be “the serpent behind the innocent flower” when he has to fool the others into thinking he had nothing to do with Duncan’s death. Nature and the unnatural play an extrusive role throughout Macbeth and have greatly contributed to the story.    In conclusion, nature and supernatural occurrences present themselves as a significant and considerable contribution to the characters experiences and their actions. Nature and supernatural elements occur multiple times throughout Macbeth. For instance, fire, wind, and storms are examples of nature. In addition, the Weird sisters, and ghosts inhabit supernatural characteristics. Without the existence of the natural and unnatural, Shakespeare would not have been able to create the story of Macbeth.