In conclusion, there are many symbols that demonstrates Holden’s inability to come to terms with the truth. He’s constantly hung up on stopping the inevitable -which is children growing up. A specific symbol of this is the Museum of Natural History.     Holden finds comfort whenever he used to go to the museum. Reason for this is, no matter how old the artifacts were, nothing seemed to change about them. Day after day, it remained the same as how it originally was. The deeper meaning to the museum is that it represent innocence being preserved. Holden is under the allusion that keeping a child from growing up is what’s best for them when in actuality it’s not. Growing up and maturing is an important aspect in life that Holden can’t seem to grasp until later on in the novel. The museum represent Holden’s hesitation to grow up because he wants childhood to be frozen and never changing as the museum is. The museum appealed to him because the exhibits stayed the same no matter how much his own life was changing around him. When Holden visits the museum he explains,  The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody’d move. You could go there a hundred thousand times, and that Eskimo would still be just finished catching those two fish, the birds would still be on their way south, the deers would still be drinking out of that water hole …. Nobody’d be different. The only thing that would be different would be youWhen Holden says the only thing that would be different is you, The changes he is talking about are all bad one, like Allie dying and having to grieve the death of his loved brother or him having multiple  bad school experiences. He doesn’t want his younger sister or other children exposed to the same failure and disappointment he had to endure when growing up. The museum is like Holdens safe haven because it hasn’t been infected with the evil of adults or maturity.